HELPING GOOD PEOPLE
WITH REAL PROBLEMS
IN SHREVEPORT &
BOSSIER CITY

Personal Injury | Wrongful Death | Criminal Defense

JOSH CLAYTON LAW FIRM PRACTICE AREAS

AT JOSH CLAYTON LAW FIRM

We give incredible legal representation to individuals who have been harmed in accidents or hurt because of the carelessness of another party.

Since opening our doors in 2008, our law firm has become known for “helping good people with real problems.” We have the capacity to forcefully and legally seek our clients’ interests,
standing up to big insurance companies and huge businesses.

As experienced specialists in personal injury and criminal legal matters, we recognize what you are experiencing, and will fight for you, your friends, and family through troublesome times. Whether you are looking for a Shreveport personal injury lawyer, a wrongful death lawyer in Bossier City, or a criminal defense attorney in Shreveport or Bossier City, we’ve got you covered.

Contact us today for any legal issues you face and our firm will seek the best result for your case.

Joshua Oliver ClaytonReviewsout of 14 reviews

Jenny McCartey – Josh Clayton is an exceptional attorney with genuine integrity. I have personally used his services several times for business related services, and he is the only attorney I will use. I would (and have!) refer my family and friends to him because I know he will take care of them with the utmost professionalism. If your situation is beyond his scope, you can be assured he will connect you with the appropriate professional to take care of you.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How do I know if I have a case?
Call us now (318.220.4095) to discuss your case. If your injuries were caused as a result of someone else’s negligence, you may have a case. An in-person consultation will be scheduled and you can meet with an attorney to discuss the unique facts and circumstances that caused your injury. The merits of your case will be discussed at the consultation.

What if I can’t afford an attorney?
Personal injury cases are handled on a contingency fee basis. In almost all cases handled by my office, no out-of-pocket expense is required of the client. The attorney gets paid only when the client gets paid. The office covers all costs occasioned by the claim – even paying medical expenses when necessary. If filing suit is necessary, the office covers that expense too. The attorney fee is calculated as a percentage of the total settlement or trial verdict. Any costs that are spent in getting the case to settlement or verdict will also be deducted from the total amount to reimburse the office. The attorney only gets paid a fee, and the office only gets reimbursed for costs, when the case settles or when a successful trial verdict is achieved.

When should I call about my case?
Immediately! In injury cases, time matters. The evidence is spoiling on the vine. We need to meet you immediately and discuss your case.

What should I do if I am involved in an accident?
  1. Check yourself and your passengers for any injuries.
  2. Check all vehicles, drivers, and passengers involved for injuries.
  3. Call law enforcement and report the accident.  Ask for an ambulance to be dispatched if injuries warrant EMS attention.
  4. Do not move your vehicle unless there is a potential for oncoming traffic to impact it.  For instance, if you are on the “blind” side of a hill or a curve you should probably move your vehicle off the roadway (if possible) to avoid another wreck and/or further injury.
  5. Use your cell phone to take pictures of the accident scene and the vehicles involved.
  6. Share contact information and insurance information with all other vehicles involved in the accident after the police arrive.  Take a photo of the other drivers’ insurance cards.
  7. Explain your side of the story to the investigating officer.
    1. Ensure the officer knows the direction you were traveling and
    2. the lane you occupied at the time of impact.
  8. Intersections:
    1. Light control:  If you had a green light (green ball, green arrow) be specific and advise the officer.
    2. Sign control:  If you were at a stop sign, 4-way stop, etc., give the officer the details of who arrived first and who drove first, etc.
  9. If you make a written statement:
    1. Be clear and concise.
    2. Do not be too wordy.
    3. Do not guess as to what occurred – only write what you know to be true.
    4. Explain direction of travel and lane of travel for your vehicle (and other vehicles if known).
  10. Obtain the investigating officers’ names and badge numbers.
  11. Notify your insurance agent regardless of fault.
  12. If you were injured in the wreck, seek medical attention.
  13. Pick up the accident report when it is ready.
    1. Review it.
    2. If you find a discrepancy, notify the law enforcement agency immediately.
What is personal injury?
Personal injury cases refer to matters where one person’s negligence causes another person’s injuries. As an example, a “car wreck” isn’t necessarily a personal injury case. The car wreck becomes a personal injury case when the at-fault driver was negligent in his operation of his/her vehicle, it caused the car wreck, and the other driver was injured in the wreck.

What is the time for filing a lawsuit?
A claimant has one year from the date of his/her injury to file a lawsuit. The filing of a lawsuit protects the injured party’s right to recover damages occasioned by the at-fault party’s negligence. Not all claims require the filing of a lawsuit – many are resolved by settlement long before the one-year mark. At any time before the filing of a lawsuit, the matter is referred to as being in the “claims stage.” After the lawsuit is filed, the matter is referred to as being “in litigation.”

Sometimes a lawsuit is filed sooner rather than later – if liability is in dispute at the claims stage, an attorney will usually file suit to move the case into litigation. “Liability” is lawyer and insurance company language for “who’s at fault?” When each side is pointing a finger at the other side for who’s to blame, lawyers get involved and conduct “discovery” to flesh out liability. If interrogatories, requests for production of documents, requests for admissions, and depositions cannot sufficiently put the liability issue to rest, a trial may be necessary to allow a judge or jury to make the call as to who’s at fault.

Will my case go to trial?
Very few claims move into litigation. Very few litigated cases go to trial. But some do.
You’ll need a good trial attorney if that happens. Pick a good trial attorney at the outset of your claim and you won’t have to worry in the event your matter proceeds to trial.